Flipping out for a bit of extreme fun Jump Around: Shaun Wood showing his athleticism at a parkour event at The Station in Newcastle on Sunday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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Shaun Wood showing his athleticism at a parkour event at The Station in Newcastle on Sunday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Jenbae Mcilroy practicing parkour. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Teddy Umbaugh and Jerra Williams. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Jerra Williams, Teddy Umbaugh, instructor Alex Rzechowicz, and Mirina Williams. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Alysha Bagstaff. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Alysha Bagstaff. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Mirina Williams, Olivia Conyngham and Alysha Bagstaff. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Mirina Williams, Alysha Bagstaff, and Olivia Conyngham. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebookThe urbansubculture of parkour is said to existsomewhere betweenmartial arts and sport.

For most people, it’s an activitythat probably bringsto mind images of super athletesleapingand flippingoff rooftops andwalls.

But there’s another less dangerous andmore controlled side to the discipline,which wason display in Newcastle on Sunday at The Station – once the end of the line for trains into town.

Renew Newcastleis renowned for making use of vacant spaces, most notably empty shops, at a time when the city’s revitalisation was still in its infancy.

Now the not-for-profit organisation has the taskofbringing The Station to life. So it gave some space and time to theparkour enthusiasts, whodid exactlythis.

Newcastle Parkour co-founder Jason Phua said parkour was about “overcoming obstacles, whether they be physical or mental”.

“It’s a way of living and seeing the world,” Mr Phua said.

“We train ourselves to be ready for emergencies.

“Imagine you’re being chased by a big dog. You’ll be running, climbing andvaulting to get out of there as quick as possible.”

Jerra Williams, 14,was among a group of teenagers involved in the parkour display.

Jerra saidhe’dbecomemuchfitter since he started the activity about a yearago. It had improved his strength, endurance and coordination.

“I saw it on TV and YouTube and wanted to give it a try,” Jerra, of Toronto, said.

“It turned out to be loads of fun. You can do it anywhere.”

Civic,Nobbys, Honeysuckle andBar Beach tend to be favourite spots for outdoors’ parkour.But it’s also done indoors at classes atThe Ninja Parcat Howzat in Cooks Hill.

Newcastle Parkour co-founderAlex Rzechowicz said parkour gives people confidence.

“It helps them become more coordinated,” he said.

“One of the kids we trainedwas riding downhill on a bike and hisfront tyre got stuck. Hewent headfirst over the handlebars, but the skills he learned at parkour meant herolled and didn’t break any bones.”

The groupnow hasa female instructorand an increasing number of girls involved,which he said was quite an achievement given it had been a male-dominated activity.